Jul 10, 2020

The audit report:

https://about.fb.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Civil-Rights...

From the audit’s About section:

> This investigation into Facebook’s policies and practices began in 2018 at the behest and encouragement of the civil rights community and some members of Congress, proceeded with Facebook’s cooperation, and is intended to help the company identify, prioritize, and implement sustained and comprehensive improvements to the way it impacts civil rights.

> The Audit was led by Laura W. Murphy, a civil rights and civil liberties leader, along with a team from civil rights law firm Relman Colfax, led by firm partner Megan Cacace.

> During the first six months of the audit, Laura W. Murphy interviewed and gathered the concerns of over 100 civil rights organizations. Over the course of the Audit’s two year engagement, that number exceeded 100 organizations, hundreds of advocates and several members of Congress. The focus areas for the audit, which were informed by those interviews, were described in the first preliminary audit report, released in December 2018. That was followed by a second update in July 2019, which identified areas of increasing concern for the Auditors. This third report will be the Auditors’ final analysis.

> The Civil Rights Audit is not an audit of Facebook’s performance as compared to its tech industry peers. In some areas it may outperform peers with respect to civil rights, and in other areas, it may not. The Auditors are not privy to how other companies operate and therefore do not draw comparisons in this report. The scope of the work on the Audit was focused only on the US and the core Facebook app (rather than Instagram, WhatsApp, or other Facebook, Inc. products).

Original title was vague. It was, including lede:

Why Facebook failed its civil rights audit

The new, deeply critical report highlights the tension between free expression and hate speech on the social network.