Dec 07, 2016

That's a great example of how even some of the most influential minds are fallible. Lamport is sort of the god of distributed systems, having invented vector clocks, paxos which is how there is any sanity in modern data centers (chubby, ZK, etcd, etc... are based on the core ideas of this), TLA+ for reasoning about correctness, so much great stuff. Check out some of these! http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/lamport/pubs/t... http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/lamport/pubs/p...

Oct 27, 2016

> They are claiming there's no global synchronization and a global order.

Need to update your textbook ;) http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/lamport/pubs/t...

In particular, what we did is described here: https://github.com/bus1/documentation/wiki/Message-ordering

If anything is unclear or misleading, please let me know and I'll try to clarify.

Jul 11, 2016

The whole scheme was already alluded to in Lamport's original paper. (Look for whenever he mentions `physical'.)

http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/lamport/pubs/t...

Feb 09, 2016

More important than that paper are the rest of the papers by Leslie Lamport.

Specifically the paper entitled Time, Clocks and the Ordering of Events in a Distributed System. [1]

This is basically the seminal paper on distributed systems and should be required reading for anyone considering playing with distributed locking mechanisms.

[1] http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/lamport/pubs/t...

Jan 19, 2016

Few programmers have read the most important paper in this area, Leslie Lamport's "Time, Clocks, and the Ordering of Events in a Distributed System" (1978)

If you want to be one of the few:

http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/lamport/pubs/t...